Roy Rogers, born Leonard Franklin Slye (November 5, 1911 – July 6, 1998), was an American singer and cowboy actor, one of the most heavily marketed and merchandised stars of his era, as well as being the namesake of the Roy Rogers Restaurants franchised chain. He and his wife Dale Evans, his golden palomino, Trigger, and his German Shepherd dog, Bullet, were featured in more than 100 movies and The Roy Rogers Show. The show ran on radio for nine years before moving to television from 1951 through 1957. His productions usually featured a sidekick, often either Pat Brady (who drove a Jeep called “Nellybelle”), Andy Devine, or the crotchety George “Gabby” Hayes. Rogers’s nickname was “King of the Cowboys”. Evans’s nickname was “Queen of the West.”

Pecos Bill is an American cowboy, apocryphally immortalized in numerous tall tales of the Old West during American westward expansion into the Southwest of Texas, New Mexico, Southern California, and Arizona. Their stories were probably invented into short stories and book by Edward J. O’Reilly in the early 20th Century and are considered to be an example of fakelore. Pecos Bill was a late addition to the “big man” idea of characters, such as Paul Bunyan or John Henry.
The first stories were published in 1917 by Edward O’Reilly for The Century Magazine, and collected and reprinted in 1923 in the book Saga of Pecos Bill (1923). O’Reilly said they were part of an oral tradition told by cowboys during the westward expansion and settlement of the southwest including Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. However American folklorist Richard M. Dorson found that O’Reilly invented the stories as “fakelore”, and later writers either borrowed tales from O’Reilly or added further adventures of their own invention to the cycle. One of the most well known versions of the Pecos Bill stories is by James Cloyd Bowman in Pecos Bill: The Greatest Cowboy of All Time (1937) which won the Newbery Honor in 1938, and was republished in 2007.

Edward “Tex” O’Reilly co-authored a cartoon strip with cartoonist Jack A. Warren, also known as Alonzo Vincent Warren, between 1929 and 1938. When O’ Reilly died in 1938, Warren began a strip titled Pecos Pete’. This was a story about “Pecos Bill”, who had received a “lump on the naggan” that caused him amnesia. The cartoons originally were published in The Sun and were later syndicated. He also has a wife, named Slue-Foot Sue.
Pecos Bill made the leap to film in the 1948 Disney animated feature Melody Time. He was portrayed by Patrick Swayze in Disney’s 1995 film Tall Tale.
“Pecos Bill” was also the nickname of Civil War general William Shafter, although this was before O’Reilly created the legend. Shafter was considered a hero in Texas and even had some legendary poetry written about how tough he was.

RCA Victor.
From Walt Disney’s Melody Time with the sons of the Pioneers.

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One response »

  1. I LOVE this one. The Sons of the Pioneers are my favorite group, especially the 1940’s lineups of men. 😀 Pecos Bill is an all-around winner in my book! They did several versions of it, but I think only this one made it to record. I might be wrong.

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