It Doesn’t Hurt a Bit to Be Polite

Pick Up After You
Tex Ritter
Capitol CAS-3228
Total Time: 4:44

Woodward Maurice Ritter (January 12, 1905 – January 2, 1974), better known as Tex Ritter, was an American country music singer and movie actor popular from the mid-1930s into the 1960s, and the patriarch of the Ritter family in acting (son John and grandson Jason). He is a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame.

An early pioneer of country music, Ritter soon became interested in show business. In 1928, he sang on KPRC-AM in Houston, a 30-minute show featuring cowboy songs. That same year, he moved to New York City and landed a job in the men’s chorus of the Broadway show The New Moon (1928). He appeared as cowboy Cord Elam in the Broadway production Green Grow the Lilacs (1930), the basis for the musical Oklahoma!. He also played the part of Sagebrush Charlie in The Round Up (1932) and Mother Lode (1934).

In 1932, he starred in New York City’s first broadcast Western, The Lone Star Rangers on WOR-AM, where he sang and told tales of the Old West. Ritter wrote and starred in Cowboy Tom’s Roundup on WINS-AM in 1933, a daily children’s cowboy program aired over two other East Coast stations for three years. He also performed on the radio show WHN Barndance and sang on NBC Radio shows; and appeared in several radio dramas including CBS’s Bobby Benson’s Adventures and on the syndicated TV show Death Valley Days.

Ritter began recording for American Record Company (Columbia Records) in 1933. His first release was “Goodbye Ole Paint”. He also recorded “Rye Whiskey” for the label. In 1935, he signed with Decca Records, where he recorded his first original recordings, “Sam Hall” and “Get Along Little Dogie”. He recorded 29 songs for Decca, the last in 1939 in Los Angeles, California as part of Tex Ritter and His Texans.

Ritter’s recording career was his most successful period. He was the first artist signed with the newly-formed Capitol Records as well as its first Western singer. His first recording session was on June 11, 1942.

In 1944, he scored a hit with “I’m Wastin’ My Tears on You”, which hit No. 1 on the country chart and eleven on the pop chart. “There’s a New Moon Over My Shoulder” was a country chart No. 2 and pop chart No. 21. In 1945, he had the No. 1, 2, and 3 songs on Billboard’s Most Played Jukebox Folk Records poll, a first in the industry. Between 1945 and 1946, he registered seven consecutive top five hits, including “You Two-Timed Me One Time Too Often” (No. 1) written by Jenny Lou Carson, which spent eleven weeks on the charts. In 1948, “Rye Whiskey” and his cover of “The Deck of Cards” both made the top ten and “Pecos Bill” reached No. 15. In 1950, “Daddy’s Last Letter (Private First Class John H. McCormick)” also became a hit.

Ritter first toured Europe in 1952, where his appearances included a starring role in the Texas Western Spectacle at London’s Harringay Arena. That same year, Ritter recorded the movie title-track song “High Noon (Do Not Forsake Me Oh My Darlin’)”, which became a hit. At the first televised Academy Awards ceremony in 1953, he sang “High Noon”, which received an Oscar for Best Song that year.[1]

In 1953, he began performing on Town Hall Party on radio and television in Los Angeles. In 1957 he co-hosted Ranch Party, a syndicated version of the show. He made his national TV debut in 1955 on ABC-TV’s Ozark Jubilee and was one of five rotating hosts for its 1961 NBC-TV spin-off, Five Star Jubilee.

He formed Vidor Publications, Inc., a music publishing firm, with Johnny Bond, in 1955. “Remember the Alamo” was the first song in the catalog. In 1957, he released his first album, Songs From the Western Screen. He was often featured in archival footage on the children’s television program, The Gabby Hayes Show.

In 1961, he also released the hit “I Dreamed Of A Hill-Billy Heaven,” released six years earlier by Eddie Dean.

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