Robert Lewis Stevenson
TREASURE ISLAND

Adapted by Ralph Rose
Produced by Les Mitchel
Chorus under the direction of Richard Davis

Narrator and John Silver – BASIL RATHBONE
Jim Hawkins – DIX DAVIS
Billy Bones – KEN CHRISTY
Squire Trelawney – RAYMOND LAWRENCE
Captain Smollett – RICHARD AHERNE
Pirate – JOSEPH GRANEY
Ben Gunn – HARRY LANG

Columbia Masterworks Set MM 553
Recorded in 1944

Sir Basil Rathbone, KBE, MC, Kt (13 June 1892 – 21 July 1967) was an English actor. He rose to prominence in England as a Shakespearean stage actor and went on to appear in over 70 films, primarily costume dramas, swashbucklers, and, occasionally, horror films. He frequently portrayed suave villains or morally ambiguous characters, such as Murdstone in David Copperfield (1935) and Sir Guy of Gisbourne in The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938). His most famous role, however, was heroic—that of Sherlock Holmes in fourteen Hollywood films made between 1939 and 1946 and in a radio series. His later career included Broadway and television work; he received a Tony Award in 1948 as Best Actor in a Play.

Treasure Island is an adventure novel by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, narrating a tale of “pirates and buried gold”. First published as a book on May 23, 1883, it was originally serialized in the children’s magazine Young Folks between 1881–82 under the title Treasure Island; or, the mutiny of the Hispaniola with Stevenson adopting the pseudonym Captain George North.

Traditionally considered a coming-of-age story, Treasure Island is an adventure tale known for its atmosphere, characters and action, and also as a wry commentary on the ambiguity of morality — as seen in Long John Silver — unusual for children’s literature then and now. It is one of the most frequently dramatized of all novels. The influence of Treasure Island on popular perceptions of pirates is enormous, including treasure maps marked with an “X”, schooners, the Black Spot, tropical islands, and one-legged seamen carrying parrots on their shoulders.

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