The House at Pooh Corner (1928) is the second volume of stories about Winnie-the-Pooh, written by A. A. Milne and illustrated by E. H. Shepard. It is notable for the introduction of the character Tigger, who went on to become a prominent figure in the Disney Winnie the Pooh franchise.

The title comes from a story in which Winnie-the-Pooh and Piglet build a house for Eeyore. In another story the game of Poohsticks is invented.

Hints that Christopher Robin is growing up, scattered throughout the book, come to a head in the final chapter, in which the inhabitants of the Hundred Acre Wood throw him a farewell party after learning that he must leave them for good soon. It is made obvious – though not stated explicitly – that he is starting school. In the end, as they say good-bye to Christopher Robin, they realise they will never see him again. Pooh and Christopher Robin say a long, private farewell, in which Pooh promises never to forget him.

This is read by Robert Shaw the choral conductor of the Robert Shaw Chorale. He used to read the story to his children and his friends told him he should record it so he did, I think in the 1940s Maybe. He must have produced a few copies to give out to his friends for their children. I met him in 1966 at the Meadowbrook School of Music in Oakland Michigan for he was a guest conductor. One day he read the story, or perhaps just told it from memory being so familiar with it, to the hundred and twenty of us in the youth Corral. we loved it. He asked if we would like a record of it and of course we all said yes. It took a few months but eventually I got my record and have loved it ever since. Nobody could toe Winnie the Pooh like Robert Shaw.

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2 responses »

  1. MaryLou Dennis says:

    This is not read by Robertshaw the actor. This is read by Robert Shaw the choral conductor of the Robert Shaw Chorale. He used to read the story to his children and his friends told him he should record it so he did, I think in the 1940s Maybe. He must have produced a few copies to give out to his friends for their children. I met him in 1966 at the Meadowbrook School of Music in Oakland Michigan for he was a guest conductor. One day he read the story, or perhaps just told it from memory being so familiar with it, to the hundred and twenty of us in the youth Corral. we loved it. He asked if we would like a record of it and of course we all said yes. It took a few months but eventually I got my record and have loved it ever since. Nobody could toe Winnie the Pooh like Robert Shaw.

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